Howard Hodgkin, the British painter whose bold, vivid semi-dynamic dreams earned him the Turner Prize, his nation’s most astounding honor for a craftsman, died Thursday, the Tate Galleries said. He was 84.

Hodgkin’s work exhibited a baffle to the workmanship world. Some viewed his work as conceptual, a mark he shunned. Others discovered an incentive in the feeling his painstakingly developed and finished shading swaths evoked.

Hodgkin came to global noticeable quality with a sprinkle after a show at the Venice Biennale in 1984, acquiring him wide acclaim and the consideration of workmanship faultfinders from around the globe, setting his place as a noteworthy voice in Europe’s post-war craftsmanship world.

After his Turner Prize came significant display appears in London and the United States, where his sketches challenged simple portrayal by faultfinders.

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